Publications

PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES

(*) indicates SIS student

Kiefer, K (*) and M Ranganathan. 2018. “The Politics of Participation in Cape Town’s Slum Upgrading: The Role of Productive Tension”. Journal of Planning Education and Research. https://doi.org/10.1177/0739456X18761119 IF 1.196.

Doshi, S and M Ranganathan. 2018.“Toward a Critical Geography of Corruption and Power in Late Capitalism”, Progress in Human Geography. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0309132517753070 IF 5.162.

Doshi, S and M Ranganathan. 2017. “Contesting the Unethical City: Land Dispossession and Corruption Narratives in Urban India”, Annals of the American Association of Geographers 107 (1): 183-199. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/24694452.2016.1226124 IF 2.291.

Ranganathan, M. 2016. “Thinking with Flint: Racial Liberalism and the Roots of an American Water Tragedy”, Capitalism Nature Socialism 27 (3): 17-33 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10455752.2016.1206583

Ranganathan, M. Revise and Resubmit. “Producing Race, Class, and Difference through Property: A Genealogy of Liberal ‘Improvement’”, Environment and Planning: A. IF 1.604.

Ranganathan, M. 2015. “Storm Drains as Assemblages: The Political Ecology of Flood Risk in Postcolonial Bangalore”, Antipode 47 (5): 1300-1320. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/anti.12149. Video abstract: http://antipodefoundation.org/2015/06/03/storm-drains-as-assemblages/. IF 2.104.

Ranganathan, M and C Balazs. 2015. “Water Marginalization at the Urban Fringe: Environmental Justice and Urban Political Ecology Across the North-South Divide”, Urban Geography 36 (3): 403-423. IF 1.355.

Ranganathan, M. 2014. “Paying for Water, Claiming Citizenship: Political Agency and Water Reforms at the Urban Periphery”, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 38 (2): 590-608. IF 1.672.

Ranganathan, M. 2014. “Mafias in the Waterscape: Urban Informality and Everyday Public Authority in Bangalore”, Water Alternatives 7 (1): 89-105.

Ranganathan, M, L Kamath and V Baindur. 2009. “Piped Water Supply to Greater Bangalore: Putting the Cart Before the Horse?”, Economic and Political Weekly 44 (33): 53-62.

Haya, B, M Ranganathan, and S Kirpekar. 2009. “Barriers to Sugar Mill Cogeneration in India: Insights into the Structure of Post-2012 Climate Financing Instruments”, Climate and Development 1 (1): 66–81. IF 1.379.

Chaurey, A, M Ranganathan, and P Mohanty. 2004. “Electricity Access For Geographically Disadvantaged Rural Communities—Technology And Policy Insights”, Energy Policy (32) 15: 1693-1705. IF 2.575.

Prasad, R., M Ranganathan, P B Singh, and I H Rehman. 2003. “How Community Participation Can Integrate Energy Transitions Into Rural Development—The Experience Of Four North Indian Villages”. The Journal of Energy and Development (28) 2.

BOOK CHAPTERS AND BOOK REVIEWS

Ranganathan, M and S Doshi. Forthcoming (2018). “A Radical Politics for the Anthropocene? Political Ecologies of Dispossession and Anticorruption in Urban India” in H Ernstson and E Swyngedouw (Eds), Interrupting the Anthro-Obscene: Political possibilities of planetary urbanization. Routledge.

Ranganathan, M. 2018.“Rethinking Urban Water Informality” in K Conca and E Weinthal (Eds), Oxford Handbook on Water Politics and Policy. Oxford University Press: Oxford and New York. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199335084.001.0001

Ranganathan, M. 2017. “”Hydraulic Politics In/Beyond the World Class City” Review Forum for Lisa Bjorkman’s Pipe Politics. Dialogues in Human Geography 7 (3): 349-351.

Ranganathan, M. 2017. “Endangered City by Austin Zeiderman and Hydraulic City by Nikhil Anand Review Forum“, Society and Space, the blog for the journal Environment and Planning: D.

Ranganathan, M. 2013. “Financialized and Insurgent: The Dialectics of Participation in Bangalore’s Neoliberal Water Reforms”, pp 65-88 in K Coelho, L Kamath, and M Vijayabaskar (Eds), Participolis: Consent and Contention in India’s Neoliberal Urban Governance. Routledge: Abingdon and New Delhi.

Ranganathan, M. 2012. “Reengineering Citizenship: Municipal Reforms and the Politics of ‘e-Grievance Redressal’ in Karnataka’s Cities”, pp 109-132 in R Desai and R Sanyal (Eds), Urbanizing Citizenship: Contested Spaces in Indian Cities. Sage: Thousand Oaks and New Delhi.

Ranganathan, M. 2011. “The Embeddedness of Cost Recovery: Water Reforms and Associationism at Bangalore’s Fringes”, pp 165-190 in J Anjaria and C McFarlane (Eds), Urban Navigations: Politics, Space, and the City in South Asia. Routledge: Abingdon and New Delhi.

NON-PEER REVIEWED AND PUBLIC SCHOLARSHIP

Ranganathan, M. 2017. “The Environment as Freedom: A Decolonial Reimagining”, Social Science Research Council Items Series on “Just Environments” http://items.ssrc.org/the-environment-as-freedom-a-decolonial-reimagining/ Republished in Black Perspectives, the blog of the African American Intellectual History Society http://www.aaihs.org/the-environment-as-freedom-a-decolonial-reimagining/

Ranganathan, M and S Doshi. 2017. “The Color of Corruption: Whiteness and Populist Narratives”, Society & Space Open Site, Environment and Planning: D http://societyandspace.org/2017/02/07/the-color-of-corruption-on-the-perverse-morality-of-whiteness/

Ranganathan, M. December 10, 2015. “Why Bengaluru is not Immune to Floods: It’s All About Land (and Money)”, Citizen Matters. http://bangalore.citizenmatters.in/articles/why-bengaluru-is-not-immune-to-floods-it-s-all-about-land-and-money.

Ranganathan, M. 2014. “High Tech and the Monsoon” in R Burdett, P Rode, P Shankar, and S Vahidy (Eds), Governing Urban Futures (Urban Age Series). London: London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ranganathan, M. 2008. “Grievance Redressal Mechanisms in Urban Service Delivery: How Effective Are They?” Asian Development Bank Governance Brief 17. Manila: Asian Development Bank.

Ranganathan, M and E Reynaers. 2003. “Enabling Environments for Technology Transfer”. Technical paper commissioned by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Secretariat, Bonn.

Ranganathan, M, R Prasad and P B Singh. 2003. “Participatory approach for linking rural energy transitions and developmental needs in Uttar Pradesh, India”, Boiling Point, 49: 15-17.